Archive for category Data Security

Hold the Phone! Your Cloud-Storage Files May Be Vulnerable

Posted by on Friday, 22 March, 2013

The cloud storage services market has seen tremendous growth in just the last two years. Reports indicate a growth from 300 million cloud storage subscriptions in 2011 to over 500 million in 2012. The popularity and convenience of mobile devices have fueled this growth, with cloud services presenting a way for companies and their employees to share files anytime and from anywhere.

dangers of mobile file transfers in the cloudThe ability to access virtually any type of document from your smartphone has been both a great tool, and a potentially serious risk.   Sharing files in the cloud allows your traveling sales representatives to access their latest sales report from their tablet, and lets the exec review accounting figures from their phones. Once the files are viewed, the users can delete them and assume everything is safe.

While cloud storage services may be convenient, they also present many security vulnerabilities. One of those vulnerabilities is that unauthorized users may be able to gain access to your files stored in the cloud through your mobile phones.

A recent article published in InfoWorld details the findings of a new report that focused on the security risks of using cloud storage services like Dropbox, Box and SugarSync. It described how researchers were able to recover a variety of different files from multiple mobile devices including iPhones and Android devices, even after they had been deleted from the cloud.  In addition, data about the cloud service user was also accessible via the phones.

Given how many mobile devices are lost and stolen every day, if you or your employees use a cloud storage solution to transfer sensitive data, it’s possible that someone with the right expertise could access those files using your mobile device.

Two important precautions companies can take to minimize risk are to train employees to follow established security policies, and give them easy access to a secure and convenient way to share and store files.

Secure managed file transfer solutions are an excellent alternative to the cloud storage services, providing the ability to transfer files – both batch and ad-hoc — without risk of unauthorized access. It puts the control for data security back into the hands of the IT team without compromising the workflow for employees.

Managed file transfer solutions offer many features not typically included in cloud based storage solutions like encrypted file transfer protocols, error reporting, audit trails, and support for SFTP, FTPS, and HTTPS – all important to maintain the utmost level of security.

 

 

Jennifer Phillips

Jennifer Phillips is a technology blogger and social media expert. With a focus on the data security and the IBM i market, she has over 10 years of experience writing for publications on technology solutions.

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RSA Conference kicks off in San Francisco

Posted by on Tuesday, 26 February, 2013

RSA data security, GoAnywhere

Linoma begins our busy trade show season with an exhibit at the RSA Conference in San Francisco this week.  Our team, including (pictured left to right) Brian Pick, T. J. Rickert and Steve Luebbe, is ready to talk to attendees about how easily they can automate, simplify, and encrypt their data transfers with GoAnywhere.

If you’re in the neighborhood, stop by Booth #242 and register to win a Google Nexus 7 tablet and pick up a free flash drive.  For more information about other trade shows we’ll be attending, check out this post on the Linoma Software blog.

Susan Baird

Susan is the Marketing Manager at Linoma Software, helping promote our secure file transfer and encryption solutions. Her specialty is content creation and social media marketing.

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Retailers Struggle to Protect Against Data Breach

Posted by on Tuesday, 12 February, 2013

data breach, data securityAs thousands of harried spouses and romantically entangled Americans scramble to find the right Valentine’s Day gifts this week, many are pulling out the credit cards and ordering online or over the phone or waiting in line to swipe their debit cards at the florist or candy store.  That’s a lot of personal data zooming through cyberspace, which can make the perfect gift for hackers.

One of the compliance regulations that controls how merchants and others handle credit card data is PCI DSS, established to prevent, detect and react to unauthorized access to personal payment information.  The standards are strict and penalties can be stiff.

The challenge comes when retailers, overwhelmed with busy shopping seasons and lines of customers, have so many things to manage that their vigilance protecting customer data can lose priority.  And yet, it just takes one misstep to open the doors to a data breach.

That’s why it’s critical that retailers and other organizations who handle credit card information regularly assess their data protection policies and processes, and implement effective encryption and data transfer tools that can automate the process of keeping data secure so they can focus on keeping their customers happy.

Check out this story in today’s Omaha World Herald about the challenges businesses of all sizes face when trying to avoid a costly data breach.  And for more information about how Linoma Software can help keep your data safe at rest and in motion, email Solutions@LinomaSoftware.com.

Susan Baird

Susan is the Marketing Manager at Linoma Software, helping promote our secure file transfer and encryption solutions. Her specialty is content creation and social media marketing.

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New Protections for Patient Data Increase Pressure For Trading Partners to Get Compliant

Posted by on Wednesday, 23 January, 2013

Yet another layer of regulation has been added to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) that offers even greater protection for healthcare patients’ privacy, while also defining new rights regarding how they can access their health records.

meet HIPAA compliance regulationsThe biggest change is the expansion of HIPAA compliance requirements to include trading partners and third parties who also handle patient data, such as billing companies, contractors, and more.  The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) reports that these third parties have been responsible for several significant data breaches which is one reason the responsibility for compliance has been extended to this group.

Penalties for violating HIPAA compliance rules will be assessed based on the determined level of negligence, and can go as high as $1.5 million per incident.

Other issues addressed with the latest additions to the HIPAA regulations include more clarity in defining which types of breaches need to be reported, as well as how patients will be allowed to access and interact with their health records electronically.

If you’re concerned about whether your FTP server meets compliance regulations, join us for a webinar on Thursday, Jan. 31 at Noon Central entitled Get Your FTP Server in Compliance!  You can learn more about the agenda for this webinar here.

For more information about the new HIPAA rules, check out the press release from HHS.

Susan Baird

Susan is the Marketing Manager at Linoma Software, helping promote our secure file transfer and encryption solutions. Her specialty is content creation and social media marketing.

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Healthcare Data Breaches on the Rise

Posted by on Wednesday, 19 December, 2012

Stories of data breaches across all industries continue to make the news, and nowhere is the pressure greater to keep data safe than on healthcare IT managers.

Healthcare IT News states that health data breaches increased by 97% in 2011. The 2012 Data Breach Investigations Report from Verizon’s RISK team confirmed that over 174 million records were reported as compromised, mostly as the result of hackers accessing the data. According to the Identity Theft Resource Center 2011 Breach Stats Report, 20% of all data breaches in 2011 were in the healthcare industry.

data breach statistics for 2012

What is most startling about this report is that, according to the RISK study, 97% of these cases could have been avoided through simple or intermediate security controls.  The graphic (see right) is one of the many included in Verizon’s study.

Because the most common place where data is compromised is from corporate databases and web servers, hackers who gain access to these vulnerable areas are mining this data for private information such as social security numbers, birthdates and credit card information.

Studies like these underscore the importance of establishing network security perimeters and implementing procedures that protect the privacy of  patients’ information residing on these servers.

IT managers must be vigilant to combat hackers’ ever more sophisticated tools and methods, and that begins with better security procedures at the office.

Security Policy and Procedures Document

The first step in ramping up security is to write and formalize a security policy and procedures document that addresses best practice protocols and that encompasses applicable HIPAA and HITECH regulations.

Next, all employees must be trained and expectations for compliance made clear,  because it takes a concerted effort on everyone’s part to ensure the required protections are implemented consistently.

Secure Data Files In Motion

One of the more popular ways for hackers to capture sensitive data is via the movement of files and documents across the Internet.  In an earlier blog post, we talked about how standard FTP is commonly used to send files.  However, FTP sends the files in unencrypted form, and offers no protection for the server’s login credentials. Once those credentials are captured, hackers can use them to access the FTP server to mine additional data files.

While managing the security of all of the files in the office may seem overwhelming, Managed File Transfer solutions can simplify this task. Used in conjunction with a reverse proxy gateway, a much greater security perimeter is formed around the network, servers and the sensitive data that need protection.

Daniel Cheney

Daniel has been the IT Director at a healthcare company for the last 12 years and a longtime beneficiary of GoAnywhere Director and the IBM i platform. He is also a technical analyst and writer for various technical and social media projects with Humanized Communications.

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