Video: How to Encrypt Files with OpenPGP Studio

Wednesday, August 7, 2013 Posted by

Have you ever been asked to email a file that includes personal information like your prescription records, or your banking account information, or even your social security number?  Many people share that kind of information over the internet and simply hope that it doesn’t get hacked.

Download OpenPGP StudioLinoma Software, developer of the enterprise solution GoAnywhere™ Managed File Transfer Suite, has made it much easier to keep this kind of confidential data protected with its recently released desktop encryption tool called GoAnywhere OpenPGP Studio™.

This free PC tool is designed for people who occasionally need to share or store sensitive data.  OpenPGP Studio lets users encrypt, decrypt, sign and verify files from their PCs or workstations.  An integrated key manager allows anyone to quickly create, import, export and manage OpenPGP keys needed to encrypt and decrypt files. Best of all, it’s intuitive so even those who claim to be “non-technical” can confidently use OpenPGP Studio.

Here’s a video, also available on YouTube, that shows just how easy OpenPGP Studio is to use.

 

You can download OpenPGP Studio from the GoAnywhere website, and then let us know what you think!  If you need a more robust solution that includes automation, check out the GoAnywhere suite of products.

 

OpenPGP, PGP and GPG: What is the difference?

Thursday, July 18, 2013 Posted by

With privacy capabilities of encryption methods such as PGP (Pretty Good Privacy), data security can be heightened and privacy can be achieved.  There are various approaches, however, and various elements of comparison for each of these acronyms.  This article will explore the differences between PGP, OpenPGP, and GPG (GNU Privacy Guard), offering brief histories of their creations and summaries of their capabilities.

PGP (Pretty Good Privacy)

The company, PGP Inc., owned the rights to the original PGP encryption software.  This software was developed by Phil Zimmermann & Associates, LLC and released in 1991 to ensure the security of files that were posted on pre-internet bulletin boards.  From 1997 until 2010, the software changed hands several times until it was acquired by Symantec Corp., who continues to develop the PGP brand.

PGP encryption uses a combination of encryption methodologies such as hashing, data compression, symmetric-key cryptography and public key cryptography to keep data secure.  This process can be used to encrypt text files, emails, data files, directories and disk partitions.

OpenPGP

Automate OpenPGP EncryptionZimmerman, one of the original PGP developers, soon began work on an open-source version of PGP encryption that employed encryption algorithms that had no licensing issues.

In 1997 he submitted an open-source PGP (OpenPGP) standards proposal to the IETF (Internet Engineering Task Force), to allow PGP standards-compliant encryption vendors to provide solutions that were compatible with other OpenPGP-compliant software vendors.   This strategy created an open and competitive environment for PGP encryption tools to thrive.

Today,  OpenPGP is a standard of PGP that is open-source for public use, and the term can be used to describe any program that supports the OpenPGP system.

GPG (GNU Privacy Guard)

GnuPGP was developed by Werner Koch and released in 1999 as an alternative to what is now Symantec’s software suite of encryption tools.  It is available as a free software download, and is based on the OpenPGP standards established by the IETF so that it would be interoperable with Symantec’s PGP tools as well as OpenPGP standards. Therefore, GPG can open and unencrypt any PGP and OpenPGP standards file.

GPG provides a graphic user interface when integrating into email and program systems such as Linux.  Some software solutions for encryption utilize GPG coding, while others encrypt using command line functions in a menu-based Perl script.

A variety of popular solutions have developed their PGP encryption products following the OpenPGP standards.  Some of these products include GoAnywhere OpenPGP Studio and GoAnywhere Director.

Summary

OpenPGP is the IETF-approved standard that describes encryption technologies that use processes that are interoperable with PGP.  PGP is a proprietary encryption solution, and the rights to its software are owned by Symantec.  GPG is another popular solution that follows the OpenPGP standards to provide an interface for end users to easily encrypt their files.

As the need to encrypt and protect data becomes ever more critical, organizations will continue to develop software based on these three systems.

 

Could your FTP server pass a compliance audit?

Tuesday, July 9, 2013 Posted by

data security compliance auditIf an auditor showed up in your office tomorrow and wanted to examine your file transfer security policies and procedures, how confident are you that your organization would earn high marks?

Take this short quiz and find out.

  1. Are you still hosting an outdated SFTP or FTP server in the public area of your network (or DMZ)?
  2. Do trading partners have access to inbound ports within your internal network to drop off or retrieve files?
  3. Are your administrative security controls granular enough to manage user access to specific files, folders and areas of the network?
  4. Can you monitor all file transfer activity and maintain detailed audit logs?
  5. Do employees have easy access to an ad hoc file transfer tool that lets them transfer files of any size, all while generating audit trails?

To find out how auditors expect you answer these questions, don’t miss our next webinar:

Get Your FTP Server Into Compliance
Thursday, July 18 at Noon Central

Linoma Software’s Chief Architect Bob Luebbe will show you how the GoAnywhere Services secure FTP server can work with GoAnywhere Gateway to keep sensitive data and credentials safely in your internal network and out of the DMZ.  He’ll also demonstrate how the two work together to allow you to exchange files with trading partners without opening inbound ports.

Do your homework so you can prepare for a visit from the auditor.  Sign up today!

 

New Android Mobile App:
GoAnywhere File Transfer at the Tap of a Finger

Wednesday, June 26, 2013 Posted by

It used to be that when we left work for the day, we really left work.  With today’s mobile culture, however, employees are staying on top of projects and communicating with customers no matter where they are.

Linoma Software found a way to make that a little easier by developing its new GoAnywhere File Transfer mobile application for the Android platform.

Now, GoAnywhere Services customers can securely exchange files with internal servers or trading partners using their mobile phone or tablet.  Trading partners can also download the app and access the customer’s web portal to exchange files securely and conveniently.

The GoAnywhere File Transfer mobile app works much like GoAnywhere Services’ ad hoc web client, and can also send files through Services’ Secure Mail feature.  It is free to download from the Google Play store.

Here are some screenshots of the Android app at work:

GoAnywhere App ad hoc web client From this screen, an employee could send or retrieve files by accessing the GoAnywhere Services ad-hoc web client.
GoAnywhere App secure mail GoAnywhere Services customers can also send files right from their phones or tablets using the Secure Mail feature.
GoAnywhere secure mail module As with the standard GoAnywhere Services Secure Mail module, users can choose from a variety of security settings before they send the secure email.

For more information about the GoAnywhere File Transfer Android app, you may read the official announcement, or contact us via email or by calling 1-800-949-4696. If you’re not familiar with GoAnywhere Services, our secure FTP server solution that’s part of the GoAnywhere managed file transfer suite of products, we’d be happy to schedule a demo with one of our product specialists.

GoAnywhere Customer Spotlight: Think Mutual Bank

Thursday, June 20, 2013 Posted by

System Administrator Amy Hoerle has spent much of her career writing custom FTP scripts, so when she first started at Think Mutual Bank, she was a little surprised to find that GoAnywhere was already handling many of their file transfer processes.

“GoAnywhere was always there and always running,” she said.  “Before, if I had to write a script, there were so many things that could go wrong that I’d have to check for. Now, I can automate all of it and make it simple with GoAnywhere, things that would take me a lot of time elsewhere.”

For more about how Think Mutual Bank uses GoAnywhere to manage file transfers, handle encryption, translate data formats, and more, watch this video interview we did at the 2013 COMMON User’s Conference.

You can find more videos like this in our Success Story Library.