Posts Tagged Data Security

MFT Helps Strengthen Business Relationships

Posted by on Monday, 9 January, 2012

Our business environment today is really all about relationships.  Not just relationships with people but also our relationship with information: private, sensitive, timely, accurate, priceless data that is literally the lifeblood of the business that we obtain daily from our trusting customers and vendors and exchange with our trusted business partners.

managed file transfer, secure file transferOf concern is how information is being exchanged. Too often, business owners/managers are stuck in the mindset of sending business information by email and if it is too big, perhaps by FTP.  Neither of these methods are, by any means, safe and secure. As businesses grow and its information relationships become more complex, how do we know who within the office is sending what data to which partners? And who is actually receiving it? As the demand for data exchange increases, so do the complexity and risk of managing all of these processes.

This increased complexity exponentially increases the chance of some information getting sent to the wrong place at the wrong time or accessed by the wrong people. If this happens, we are required by state laws to disclose this data breach to our customers, which undermines the trust and the relationships that we have so carefully worked to build with clients and partners.

As business processes continue to become more regulated and complex, it is critical that these data exchanges are improved. Controlling and automating data exchanges can be greatly simplified and secured by implementing a managed file transfer (MFT) system. The good news is that it isn’t too difficult with the right tools.  MFT solutions are available to provide powerful, yet simple ways to address these challenges.

Those companies that can earn and maintain the trust of their customers and trading partners not only through their business interactions, but also by the way they respect and protect their data exchanges, will be the leaders in today’s global business environment.

Daniel Cheney

Daniel has been the IT Director at a healthcare company for the last 12 years and a longtime beneficiary of GoAnywhere Director and the IBM i platform. He is also a technical analyst and writer for various technical and social media projects with Humanized Communications.

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Reverse Proxy Gateway Video Now Live

Posted by on Monday, 21 November, 2011

Rounding out our series of GoAnywhere product videos, we’ve recently added an overview of GoAnywhere Gateway.  It explains how incorporating a reverse proxy and a forward proxy into your managed file transfer processes adds an extra layer of protection for your private network.reverse proxy DMZ gateway

When GoAnywhere Gateway is implemented, trading partners can exchange files with your organization without gaining access to your private network because no inbound ports will need to be opened to complete the exchange.  This feature is especially important to auditors evaluating compliance with regulations such as PCI DSS, HIPAA, and SOX.

Our Gateway video premier coincides with the release of our latest white paper entitled DMZ Gateways: Secret Weapons for Data Security.  Please let us know if you’d like to learn more about how our reverse proxy DMZ gateway can improve your secure file transfer system.

Susan Baird

Susan is the Marketing Manager at Linoma Software, helping promote our secure file transfer and encryption solutions. Her specialty is content creation and social media marketing.

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Citigroup Breach Triggers Congressional Response

Posted by on Monday, 11 July, 2011

The data breach at Citigroup in May – a breach which reportedly exposed an estimated 200,000 customer accounts – has motivated members of the U.S. Congress to re-introduce legislation to penalize the very organizations that have been victimized by hackers.  What are the next steps your company should take?

New bills to protect consumers’ personal dataLinoma Software Managed File Transfer Solutions

Two bills are proposed by both House and Senate legislators.

First, Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) has introduced the Personal Data Privacy and Security Act of 2011.  The new bill provides:

  • Tough criminal penalties for individuals who intentionally or willfully conceal a security breach involving personal data;
  • A requirement that companies that maintain personal data establish and implement internal policies to protect data privacy and security; and
  • A requirement that the government ensure sensitive data is protected when the government hires  third-party contractors.

This act would also require, under threat of fine or imprisonment, that businesses and agencies notify affected individuals of a security breach by mail, telephone or email  “without unreasonable delay.” Media notices would be required for breaches involving 5,000 or more people.  The FBI and the Secret Service would need to be notified if the breach affects 10,000 or more people, compromises databases containing the information of one million or more people, or impacts federal databases or law enforcement.

But that’s not the only security bill that has businesses concerned.

In the House, Rep. Mary Bono Mack (R-Ca) is holding hearings in preparation of a bill she’s named The SAFE (Secure and Fortify) Data Act that would also require “reasonable security policies and procedures” to protect consumers and enable disclosures to victims and the Federal Trade Commission within 48 hours of a data breach.

Companies no longer viewed as the victims

All this sounds good from the consumer’s point of view. But what about the expense – and potential Linoma Software GoAnywhere Managed File Transfer Solutionpenalties – suffered by the “owners” of the data: the businesses themselves?

While these bills may address the public’s interest for notification — and indeed they would bring some semblance of a national standard – they also represent an interesting shift in the liabilities that companies will face.  How is that?

Though we currently have no federal data breach notification law, federal policies now view the companies that experience a data breach as the victims of crime. However, under the proposed legislative bills, companies that do not act quickly to appropriately secure the personal data of customers – or fail to report a data breach in a reasonable amount of time – would not only suffer the theft of data, but also be held liable for its loss.

This is a significant shift. Companies are now being viewed not as the owners of consumer data, but merely guardians and trustees whose job it is to protect that data or face criminal penalties. And the message is clear: if companies won’t take adequate precautions to secure the sensitive data of our customers, they’ll pay a hefty price.

Where does your company stand?

In a world in which diligent hackers have the power break into seemingly secure networks and systems, what can your company do?

The challenge is first to determine exactly what qualifies as adequate precautions.

GoAnywhere Secure Managed File Transfer A review of the HIPAA HITECH security provisions that took effect last year provides some insight about what the government considers adequate protection.

HITECH strongly recommends the use of encryption technology. Encryption is a good place for your company to start, especially when dealing with the data your company stores on its servers.  If sensitive data itself is kept securely encrypted, a data breach doesn’t expose the content of the information itself.

Secure managed file transfer protocols – which send data using encryption – is the second place to focus attention.

If data is encrypted when it is being securely transmitted between business partners, the value of that data should it be breached – through hacking, theft, or other malicious actions – is worthless.  Encryption and secure managed file transfers can dramatically minimize the holes of technical breaches, significantly reducing an organization’s liability.

Preventing exposure

The Citigroup data breach has rekindled the momentum for a nationwide, cross-industry data breach reporting standard. This standard will not to eliminate the physical breaches themselves. What’s needed is legislation to encourage companies secure the underlying data that is the target of the hackers.

Isn’t it time for your company to take a serious look at its liabilities and to investigate how encryption and managed file transfers can close these important security holes?

Thomas Stockwell

Thomas M. Stockwell is one of Linoma Software's subject matter experts and a top blogger in the industry. He is Principle Analyst at IT Incendiary, with more than 20 years of experience in IT as a Systems Analyst, Engineer, and IS Director.

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Data Breach: Are You Next (or Again)?

Posted by on Monday, 25 April, 2011

A data breach is closer than you think. As the percentage of data breaches increase, the risk of organizations losing your sensitive data also increases. No one wants to receive the news that some or all of their personally identifiable information (PII) was stolen. There are people who are victims of various phishing scams, but it is more likely that your information will be leaked or stolen from an organization.

The health care industry is currently in the spotlight, as they are moving to mandated Electronic Health Records (EHR) and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) is investigating the two main health care related data privacy concerns today: how to protect patient information and what is the financial harm or cost per record if it is stolen.

The numbers are staggering. According to the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (www.privacyrights.org), there have already been 47 reported leaks or breaches in the health care realm this year. That is about one every other day (102 additional reported breaches if counting business and government).

In the world of data security; breaches are no longer thought of in terms of “if,” but “when.” Fortunately, there are easy steps companies and health care organizations can take to protect the PII that they maintain from direct hacking attempts. The procedures data security companies recommend you acquire begin with the following:

  • Require strong passwords
  • Use encryption to protect files in motion and at rest
  • Reduce the number of computers that process sensitive information
  • Audit every transaction
  • Limit the number of accounts that can access the critical data

The organization you own or work for doesn’t have to be the next headline, start researching different options to protect your customer’s sensitive data and keep your organization from a possible breach. The fines and surcharges are exponentially higher than purchasing a secure managed file transfer solution or a database encryption tool. Not sure where to start? Read the Top 10 Managed File Transfer Considerations.

Bob Luebbe

Bob Luebbe has worked in the IT field since 1985. During his career, he has worked in a wide variety of roles including software development, project management, consulting and architecting large-scale applications. Bob has been with Linoma Software since 1994 and is currently serving its Chief Architect. His main focus for the last several years has been developing technologies to help organizations to automate and secure their file transfers, as well as to protect data at rest through encryption and key management.

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The Culture of Data Security

Posted by on Monday, 21 March, 2011

Data SecurityWe hear a lot of buzz about protecting both customer and company data, but it is alarming how few IT departments and enterprise users are protecting their data correctly. A recent survey conducted for Oracle reveals that fewer than 30 percent of their respondents are encrypting personally identifiable information.

Data and network security should be the basis for every IT decision, but it is typically an afterthought. The Oracle report also concludes that half of companies surveyed profess a strong commitment to data security, but only 17 percent of them have begun to scratch the surface.

Lack of data security is often due to corporate culture and the fear of change. Most companies at the corporate level agree they are committed to data security and protecting customer records. If a company’s official stance is to protect their data, where are the security holes?

In my experience, the largest security holes exist in the departments outside the core IT organization. They don’t place the same value on the data as the IT Security team. Many companies still allow their employees to perform file transfers directly from their desktops and laptops using FTP or other unsecure tools. Not only are these ad-hoc methods unsecure and capable of exposing passwords or entire databases, they do not all function alike and do not provide centralized logs.

Educating employees about the dangers of unsecured and/or unnecessary data transfer is more business-friendly than preventing it altogether. Part of this process should be moving everyone to a managed file transfer methodology, like Linoma Software’s GoAnywhere Director. This not only secures your data transfers, but it creates a digital paper trail showing where assets are going – something which is of particular importance when you consider all the data security compliance regulations in effect today.

Data security for the millions of files sent over the Internet or within “the cloud” is of great importance to all industries, including health care, retail, banking and finance. Internet transfers include the critical data needed to conduct business, such as customer and order information, EDI documents, financial data, payment information, and employee- and health-related information. Many of these information transfers relate to compliance regulations such as PCI, SOX, HIPAA and HITECH, state privacy laws, or other mandates.

We need to grow a data security culture that includes securing file transfers.

Dirk Zwart

Dirk Zwart writes Linoma Software’s User Guides for the GoAnywhere secure file transfer applications. Dirk’s writing topics have covered everything from hardware manuals, software guides, security policies for compliance projects and reviews of consumer electronics. Follow Dirk and Linoma Software on Linkedin or Facebook/Twitter.

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