Posts Tagged FTP

Managed File Transfer 101: What’s in it for Me?

Posted by on Tuesday, 8 July, 2014

managed file transfer 101 - fileTransferGroupThe term MFT (Managed File Transfer) is not new but you may be hearing it more frequently.  Changes in data security and transmission regulations have brought this established technology to the forefront, but what exactly does it entail?

Linoma Software recently hosted “Managed File Transfer 101”, a webinar to present the essentials of MFT and what you should look for when researching an MFT solution for your organization.

Current State of File Transfer

In the presentation, Bob Luebbe, chief architect of Linoma Software, talked about the existing challenges of file transfer:

  • Old technology – such as Standard FTP – is still in use despite limitations and risks posed by data “sent in the clear”.
  • Time consuming manual processes that might include the use of PC tools.  Scripts are also a legacy of old processes that continue to saddle IT departments.  Programmers create and maintain these scripts – often hundreds or thousands – to automate transfers.
  • File access is often too decentralized, making it difficult to control and manage.  Compliance has become more stringent in data management.
  • Lack of notifications critical to insure successful data movement, rather than waiting for a partner to notice missing or incomplete transfers.  Traditional logs can be helpful but are also hard to find and filter for adequate audit trails.  The big issue is meeting data privacy regulations (e.g., PCI-DSS, HIPAA, GLBA and SOX) without centralized logs.
  • Employees are still sending files unchecked.  Without a simple and secure alternative, employees find their own solutions for file portability to maintain productivity.

This final point often involves employees storing sensitive files on their PCs and laptops, sending documents through email, and utilizing cloud storage providers – like Dropbox – without proper controls in place.  If a company doesn’t have internal policies in place to address file sharing and transfers, the liability risk can be severe.

In a 2013 study by Stroz Friedberg on Information Security in American Business, it was found that 3 out of 4 office workers upload work files to their personal email or cloud account.  Of this group, 37% said it was because they prefer using their personal computer while 14% said it’s because taking their work laptop home was simply too much effort.

managed file transfer 101 - 58percent_send_to_wrong_personThe same survey highlighted the role of senior managers in an organization’s data risk.  Often the worst offenders, 58% admitted to accidently sending sensitive information to the wrong person. Just over half also admitted to taking files with them after leaving a job.

While MFT won’t put a stop to this practice, a workflow built on the secure storage of sensitive business documents will add transparency to file access activity.

What is Managed File Transfer?

File Transfers, in their basic form, involve the sharing of files with others through FTP, email or a cloud solution.  In contrast, Managed File Transfer takes a centralized enterprise-level approach to automating and securing file transfers.  This produces a secured, scheduled and trackable file transfer. By creating transparency within your organization, files are tracked and logged as they enter and leave your network.  MFT is a smart solution for companies who understand the liability and risk involved in transmitting sensitive data.

  • Keep files safe and secure
  • Make sure files go where they are needed, when they are needed
  • Track files from start to finish for compliance purposes

To see what MFT looks like in a real world example, the team at Linoma would be happy to schedule a live demo of the GoAnywhere Suite.  You can also click here to view the entire webinar for free. Discover how simple and affordable it can be to utilize an MFT solution in your organization.

Why Bother Upgrading Beyond Standard FTP?

Posted by on Thursday, 26 September, 2013

Right out of the box, most operating systems come with a built-in File Transfer Protocol (FTP) tool that makes it possible to transfer large files between people, computers and servers.  It accomplishes the key goal, which is to deliver the file from one place to another.  However, too many organizations’ philosophy has been that as long as the files were getting where they needed to go, standard FTP was good enough. That was especially true when they were transferring files internally.

The truth is that FTP alone has never been good enough, because too much information (file data, user names, passwords, etc.) is vulnerable to hackers and it only takes fairly rudimentary hacking skills to steal it.  Now with increased pressure to protect sensitive data coming from regulators and consumers, it’s urgent that companies implement a more secure file transfer method.

Take a look at this short video to hear Bob Luebbe, Linoma Software’s Chief Architect, talk about the dangers of standard FTP.

 

At the end of this video, Bob mentions the value of clustering and load balancing to promote high active-active availability. Since this video was produced, we’ve also added these features to both GoAnywhere Services and GoAnywhere Director.

In fact, Bob just delivered a free webinar on the latest updates to GoAnywhere, and you can view a recorded version here.

Susan Baird

Susan is the Marketing Manager at Linoma Software, helping promote our secure file transfer and encryption solutions. Her specialty is content creation and social media marketing.

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Message Queues and Network Shares Added to Managed File Transfer Solution

Posted by on Monday, 28 February, 2011

The new 3.5 release of GoAnywhere Director is now available with more features to help organizations automate, secure and manage file transfers.

In this new release, GoAnywhere Director provides simpler access to files and folders on Network Shares. It can also connect to enterprise Message Queues (e.g. WebSphere MQ) for better integration with customer applications. The new version also includes “File Monitors” which can be used to easily scan for new, modified and/or deleted files in targeted folders. Additionally, this release includes the ability to auto-resume file transfers if FTP and secure FTP connections are broken.

In addition, better High Availability (HA) capabilities allow GoAnywhere Director to store configurations in customer database systems including SQL Server, MySQL and DB2 for IBM I (iSeries). This allows customers to manage and replicate this data using in-house database and HA tools.

I’ll say it again, that of all the tools I have purchased over 28 years in I.T. GoAnywhere Director is my favorite! ~ Don McIntyre, Kansas City, Missouri School District

Read the press release  > >

Bob Luebbe

Bob Luebbe has worked in the IT field since 1985. During his career, he has worked in a wide variety of roles including software development, project management, consulting and architecting large-scale applications. Bob has been with Linoma Software since 1994 and is currently serving its Chief Architect. His main focus for the last several years has been developing technologies to help organizations to automate and secure their file transfers, as well as to protect data at rest through encryption and key management.

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FTP Lack of Security Exposed

Posted by on Monday, 24 January, 2011

Apollo Project CSM Simulator Computers and ConsolesFTP was designed as an easy mechanism for exchanging files between computers at a time when networks were new and information security was an immature science. In the 1970s, if you wanted to secure a server from unwanted access, you simply locked the computer room door. User access to data was controlled by the basic User ID and password scenario. (Right is a reminder of how much technology has advanced since the 1970s. The photograph,  taken December 11, 1975, is the Apollo Project CSM Simulator Computers and Consoles. Photo Courtesy of NASA.)

The Internet did not yet exist and the personal computer revolution was still a decade away.

Today, the security of business file transfers is of paramount importance. The exchange of business records between computing systems, between enterprises, and even across international borders has become critical to the global economy.

Yet, the original native FTP facility of TCP/IP wasn’t designed for the requirements of the modern, globally connected enterprise. FTP’s basic security mechanisms – the User ID and password — have long ago been outdated by advances in network sleuthing technologies, hackers, malware, and the proliferation of millions of network-attached users.

Risks associated with using native (standard) FTP include:

  • Native FTP does not encrypt data.
  • A user’s name and password are transferred in clear text when logging on and can therefore be easily recognized.
  • The use of FTP scripts or batch files leaves User IDs and passwords in the open, where they can easily be hacked.
  • FTP alone, does not meet compliance regulations. (For example: HIPAA, SOX, State Privacy Laws, etc.)
  • When using an FTP connection, the transferred data could “stray” to a remote computer and not arrive at their intended destination leaving your data exposed for third parties or hackers to intercept.
  • Conventional FTP does not natively maintain a record of file transfers.

The first step is to examine how FTP is being used in your organization. The next step is to identify how your organization needs to manage and secure everyone’s file transfers. The final step is to evaluate what type of Managed File Transfer Product your company needs.

For more information download our White Paper – Beyond FTP: Securing and Managing File Transfers.

Bob Luebbe

Bob Luebbe has worked in the IT field since 1985. During his career, he has worked in a wide variety of roles including software development, project management, consulting and architecting large-scale applications. Bob has been with Linoma Software since 1994 and is currently serving its Chief Architect. His main focus for the last several years has been developing technologies to help organizations to automate and secure their file transfers, as well as to protect data at rest through encryption and key management.

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Was FTP Behind the Wikileaks Breach?

Posted by on Monday, 3 January, 2011

November and December were difficult months for IT security.

Wikileaks began on Sunday November 28th publishing 251,287 leaked United States embassy cables, the largest set of confidential documents ever to be released into the public domain. How do security officials believe these documents were originally retrieved by the alleged source, Pfc. Bradley Manning? Many security professionals are wondering if FTP was the software mechanism used.

Also in the news was the security breach at the popular publication Gawker.com. Over the weekend of December 11, Gawker discovered that 1.2 million accounts were compromised, the infrastructure breached, and access to MySQL databases raided. Gawker internal FTP credentials were listed as a part of the breach.

Gawker’s problems prompted Social Networking giant LinkedIn to reset the passwords of all users that had Gawker.com accounts, for fear of contamination by hackers who had gained Gawker profile information.

Smaller national headlines of other breaches included the theft of an undisclosed number of email addresses, birth-dates, and other information by a contractor working for McDonalds.

Also, it was reported that a mailing list was pilfered from the drugstore giant Walgreens. In addition, a leak of law enforcement data was reported by a Mesa County, Colorado.

Finally, a popular Open Source FTP server software application, ProFTPD version 1.3.3c, was distributed containing a malicious backdoor that permits hackers to access FTP credentials. It is thought the attackers took advantage of an un-patched security flaw in the FTP daemon to gain access to the server and exchange distribution files.

What do these various breaches have in common? The threats may be too diverse to slip into a single category, but the likely culprit is the use of powerful native FTP, without proper, secure management. Once a doorway is left open, native unmanaged FTP access can wreak havoc in any organization.

It doesn’t have to be this way. Using a managed secure file server like Linoma Software’s GoAnywhere Services – which has granular permissions and security controls, along with detailed audit logs and alerts – IT can monitor and better secure and control its data resources.

Regardless of how your organization or your trusted business partners are configured to exchange data, isn’t it time to consider a better way to manage your company’s file transfer security?

Related Blog Post: Are You Confident Your FTP Credentials are Secure?

Thomas Stockwell

Thomas M. Stockwell is one of Linoma Software's subject matter experts and a top blogger in the industry. He is Principle Analyst at IT Incendiary, with more than 20 years of experience in IT as a Systems Analyst, Engineer, and IS Director.

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