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Posts Tagged High Availability

Updates for GoAnywhere Include Clustering, Disk Quotas, and More

Posted by on Wednesday, 21 August, 2013

In response to customer requests, especially from larger organizations, Linoma Software has released new enhancements such as clustering and disk quotas for GoAnywhere Director and GoAnywhere Services.  These updates to the GoAnywhere Managed File Transfer suite provide even more robust administrative control, and add automatic failover protection in the event of a server failure.

GoAnywhere Director 4.5.0 adds clustering

The new release of GoAnywhere Director 4.5.0 got a big boost when developers added clustering, a feature they added to GoAnywhere Services earlier this year.  Clustering, also know as “active-active” high availability, means that multiple installations of GoAnywhere Director can be in operation simultaneously, communicating with each other at all times.

GoAnywhere Director Clustering for High Availability

There are several advantages to clustering.  It provides assurance for users and trading partners that if something were to go wrong with one of the servers, the additional installations would automatically take over so availability would not be affected.  It also allows for load balancing, which is especially helpful for organizations with high volumes of file transfers.  Finally, it makes it easy for organizations to manage growth because they can easily incorporate additional servers to their managed file transfer environment.

GoAnywhere Services 3.3.0 adds disk quotas, bandwidth throttling

GoAnywhere Services 3.3.0 offers administrators even greater control over how users interact with their secure FTP servers.

One key enhancement is the addition of disk quotas, which allows admins to determine how much storage space to give to each trading partner and user to better manage storage device resources.

Bandwidth throttling, also new to GoAnywhere Services 3.3.0, lets administrators put limits on the amount of network resources a user can consume when transferring files.  With this feature, controls can be enforced on file uploads, downloads and even on which days or times of day are available to specific users.

With more than 50 updates in this round of enhancements, GoAnywhere continues to respond to the needs of its ever-growing consumer base.  GoAnywhere customers will be notified within their product screens that an update is available, and those who are not yet customers can contact us to get a free demo, or can download a fully-functional free trial.

For more information about the features included in the new releases, check out our news page.

 

Susan Baird

Susan is the Marketing Manager at Linoma Software, helping promote our secure file transfer and encryption solutions. Her specialty is content creation and social media marketing.

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GoAnywhere Services Clustering Is Featured in IT Jungle

Posted by on Tuesday, 15 January, 2013

Linoma Software is getting lots of attention these days thanks to the recent addition of clustering and load balancing to its GoAnywhere Services secure FTP server.   Companies who need maximum up-time can now depend on GoAnywhere as a high availability solution, especially when it comes to overcoming hardware failure.

secure ftp server high availability clustering

According to a story published in IT Jungle today, “The one-two punch of GoAnywhere Services 3.1 and GoAnywhere Gateway 2.0 will put Linoma in the game when clustering and load balancing are part of the RFP.”

Susan Baird

Susan is the Marketing Manager at Linoma Software, helping promote our secure file transfer and encryption solutions. Her specialty is content creation and social media marketing.

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What Is Your High Availability Plan for Your SFTP Server?

Posted by on Wednesday, 2 January, 2013

As your organization and its trading partners become more and more integrated, it is becoming critical that file transfers are performed without delays or disruptions.

For instance, a document containing a batch of transactions could traditionally be delivered within a window of several hours without causing any issues. But today, in the effort to make business processes as efficient as possible, that same document must now be delivered within seconds.

Organizations are therefore taking a closer look at how they can provide the best high availability for their systems to minimize any potential disruptions to their file transfers.

Comparing High Availability Strategies

Many of the secure file transfers from your trading partners are probably going through an SFTP server in your organization’s network.  If that SFTP server were to go down (for example, due to a CPU or drive failure), then you would need to fail over to a redundant backup system to continue to service your trading partners, thus maintaining high availability.

Two common approaches for providing high availability for SFTP servers and most other applications are Active-Passive or Active-Active.

Active-Passive

With an Active-Passive approach, only one SFTP server will be active at a time to service your trading partners. A backup copy of the SFTP server would exist on your network as a “passive” system, meaning that it is installed and configured, but it is not actively running.

To prepare in the event of a failure of the active SFTP server, it is important that you frequently replicate all settings and configuration files from the active SFTP server to the passive system. If the active SFTP server fails, then the passive SFTP server could be launched and your network configured to point to this new system.

In an Active-Passive configuration, the downtime for your trading partners (when a failure occurs) can be a few seconds or several hours depending on how the passive system is started.

The least efficient and often slowest implementation of an Active-Passive approach is to rely on human intervention to detect the failure and then manually start up the passive system.  This could take several hours depending on when the outage is reported, the process to start the passive system, and the complexities of configuring the network to route traffic to the new system.

A much better approach would be to have a third-party system monitoring tool that would immediately detect when the SFTP server fails, and then would automatically start up the passive system.  The result should be a a much shorter disruption for trading partners of only a few seconds.

Active-Active, or Clustering

The next level in high availability is to use an Active-Active approach, also referred to as “clustering.”

With Active-Active, two or more installations of the SFTP server can be running concurrently, sharing the same set of configurations and trading partner accounts. The SFTP servers in the cluster are in constant communication with each other, so if one of the SFTP servers were to fail, the remaining systems in the cluster will continue to service the trading partners. This configuration will provide the maximum high availability since it is not dependent on human interaction or third-party tools to start up other systems.

If you need maximum up-time for your SFTP server, GoAnywhere Services™ now offers clustering.

Another advantage of an active-active configuration is that you can load balance the traffic over multiple systems, which is important when you need to service a large number of trading partners.  This will require that you install a load balancer like GoAnywhere Gateway™ in front of the cluster.  Typically this load balancer will be in your DMZ and will be your trading partners’ initial point of contact.

The Bottom Line

Both Active-Passive and Active-Active methods provide high availability for your SFTP server environment if configured properly.  However, Active-Active will provide the maximum up-time because it keeps multiple SFTP servers running concurrently in a cluster, along with the added benefit of load-balancing.

How critical up-time is to your bottom line will be the best guide to determining which high availability approach best fits your organization.

 

Bob Luebbe

Bob Luebbe has worked in the IT field since 1985. During his career, he has worked in a wide variety of roles including software development, project management, consulting and architecting large-scale applications. Bob has been with Linoma Software since 1994 and is currently serving its Chief Architect. His main focus for the last several years has been developing technologies to help organizations to automate and secure their file transfers, as well as to protect data at rest through encryption and key management.

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Message Queues and Network Shares Added to Managed File Transfer Solution

Posted by on Monday, 28 February, 2011

The new 3.5 release of GoAnywhere Director is now available with more features to help organizations automate, secure and manage file transfers.

In this new release, GoAnywhere Director provides simpler access to files and folders on Network Shares. It can also connect to enterprise Message Queues (e.g. WebSphere MQ) for better integration with customer applications. The new version also includes “File Monitors” which can be used to easily scan for new, modified and/or deleted files in targeted folders. Additionally, this release includes the ability to auto-resume file transfers if FTP and secure FTP connections are broken.

In addition, better High Availability (HA) capabilities allow GoAnywhere Director to store configurations in customer database systems including SQL Server, MySQL and DB2 for IBM I (iSeries). This allows customers to manage and replicate this data using in-house database and HA tools.

I’ll say it again, that of all the tools I have purchased over 28 years in I.T. GoAnywhere Director is my favorite! ~ Don McIntyre, Kansas City, Missouri School District

Read the press release  > >

Bob Luebbe

Bob Luebbe has worked in the IT field since 1985. During his career, he has worked in a wide variety of roles including software development, project management, consulting and architecting large-scale applications. Bob has been with Linoma Software since 1994 and is currently serving its Chief Architect. His main focus for the last several years has been developing technologies to help organizations to automate and secure their file transfers, as well as to protect data at rest through encryption and key management.

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